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1995


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A kendama learning robot based on a dynamic optimization theory

Miyamoto, H., Gandolfo, F., Gomi, H., Schaal, S., Koike, Y., Osu, R., Nakano, E., Kawato, M.

In Preceedings of the 4th IEEE International Workshop on Robot and Human Communication (RO-MAN’95), pages: 327-332, Tokyo, July 1995, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

1995


[BibTex]


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Visual tracking for moving multiple objects: an integration of vision and control

Sitti, M, Bozma, I, Denker, A

In Industrial Electronics, 1995. ISIE’95., Proceedings of the IEEE International Symposium on, 2, pages: 535-540, 1995 (inproceedings)

pi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Batting a ball: Dynamics of a rhythmic skill

Sternad, D., Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

In Studies in Perception and Action, pages: 119-122, (Editors: Bardy, B.;Bostma, R.;Guiard, Y.), Erlbaum, Hillsdayle, NJ, 1995, clmc (inbook)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Memory-based neural networks for robot learning

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

Neurocomputing, 9, pages: 1-27, 1995, clmc (article)

Abstract
This paper explores a memory-based approach to robot learning, using memory-based neural networks to learn models of the task to be performed. Steinbuch and Taylor presented neural network designs to explicitly store training data and do nearest neighbor lookup in the early 1960s. In this paper their nearest neighbor network is augmented with a local model network, which fits a local model to a set of nearest neighbors. This network design is equivalent to a statistical approach known as locally weighted regression, in which a local model is formed to answer each query, using a weighted regression in which nearby points (similar experiences) are weighted more than distant points (less relevant experiences). We illustrate this approach by describing how it has been used to enable a robot to learn a difficult juggling task. Keywords: memory-based, robot learning, locally weighted regression, nearest neighbor, local models.

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link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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In vivo diabetic wound healing with nanofibrous scaffolds modified with gentamicin and recombinant human epidermal growth factor

Dwivedi, C., Pandey, I., Pandey, H., Patil, S., Mishra, S. B., Pandey, A. C., Zamboni, P., Ramteke, P. W., Singh, A. V.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 106(3):641-651, March (article)

Abstract
Abstract Diabetic wounds are susceptible to microbial infection. The treatment of these wounds requires a higher payload of growth factors. With this in mind, the strategy for this study was to utilize a novel payload comprising of Eudragit RL/RS 100 nanofibers carrying the bacterial inhibitor gentamicin sulfate (GS) in concert with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF); an accelerator of wound healing. GS containing Eudragit was electrospun to yield nanofiber scaffolds, which were further modified by covalent immobilization of rhEGF to their surface. This novel fabricated nanoscaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of the nanoscaffold was determined using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In the in vitro antibacterial assays, the nanoscaffolds exhibited comparable antibacterial activity to pure gentemicin powder. In vivo work using female C57/BL6 mice, the nanoscaffolds induced faster wound healing activity in dorsal wounds compared to the control. The paradigm in this study presents a robust in vivo model to enhance the applicability of drug delivery systems in wound healing applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 641–651, 2018.

pi

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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BIMROB – Bidirektionale Interaktion von Mensch und Roboter beim Bewegungslernen

Wiemeyer, J., Peters, J., Kollegger, G., Ewerton, M.

DVS Sportmotorik 2017 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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How does it feel to clap hands with a robot?

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

International Journal of Social Robotics (article) Accepted

Abstract
Playful touch serves an important role in human development and interpersonal bonding. Accordingly, we believe future robots may need lighthearted touch capabilities in order to connect with people in meaningful ways. To begin exploring how users perceive playful human-robot hand-to-and interaction, we conducted a study with 20 participants. Each user played simple hand-clapping games with the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot during a one-hour-long session involving 24 randomly ordered conditions that varied in facial reactivity, physical reactivity, stiffness, and tempo. Qualitative data collected from surveys and exper- iment recordings demonstrate that this interaction is viable: all users successfully completed the experiment, all users enjoyed at least one game, and nineteen of the 20 users identified at least one potential personal use for Baxter. Hand-clapping tempo was highly salient to users, and human-like robot errors were more widely accepted than mechanical errors. Through subjective experience data collected after each game variation, we found that perceptions of Baxter vary in the following statistically significant ways: facial reactivity increases the robot’s perceived pleasantness and arousal; physical reactivity decreases safety, pleasantness, arousal, and dominance; higher stiffness increases safety and decreases dominance; and faster tempo decreases safety, increases arousal, and increases dominance. These findings can motivate and guide roboticists who want to design social-physical human-robot interactions.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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test jon
(book)

[BibTex]


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Two-sample Hypothesis Testing for Inhomogeneous Random Graphs

Ghoshdastidar, D., Gutzeit, M., Carpentier, A., von Luxburg, U.

arXiv preprint (arXiv:1707.00833) (unpublished)

slt

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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test
(article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]