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1993


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Learning passive motor control strategies with genetic algorithms

Schaal, S., Sternad, D.

In 1992 Lectures in complex systems, pages: 913-918, (Editors: Nadel, L.;Stein, D.), Addison-Wesley, Redwood City, CA, 1993, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
This study investigates learning passive motor control strategies. Passive control is understood as control without active error correction; the movement is stabilized by particular properties of the controlling dynamics. We analyze the task of juggling a ball on a racket. An approximation to the optimal solution of the task is derived by means of optimization theory. In order to model the learning process, the problem is coded for a genetic algorithm in representations without sensory or with sensory information. For all representations the genetic algorithm is able to find passive control strategies, but learning speed and the quality of the outcome are significantly different. A comparison with data from human subjects shows that humans seem to apply yet different movement strategies to the ones proposed. For the feedback representation some implications arise for learning from demonstration.

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link (url) [BibTex]

1993


link (url) [BibTex]


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A genetic algorithm for evolution from an ecological perspective

Sternad, D., Schaal, S.

In 1992 Lectures in Complex Systems, pages: 223-231, (Editors: Nadel, L.;Stein, D.), Addison-Wesley, Redwood City, CA, 1993, clmc (inbook)

Abstract
In the population model presented, an evolutionary dynamic is explored which is based on the operator characteristics of genetic algorithms. An essential modification in the genetic algorithms is the inclusion of a constraint in the mixing of the gene pool. The pairing for the crossover is governed by a selection principle based on a complementarity criterion derived from the theoretical tenet of perception-action (P-A) mutuality of ecological psychology. According to Swenson and Turvey [37] P-A mutuality underlies evolution and is an integral part of its thermodynamics. The present simulation tested the contribution of P-A-cycles in evolutionary dynamics. A numerical experiment compares the population's evolution with and without this intentional component. The effect is measured in the difference of the rate of energy dissipation, as well as in three operationalized aspects of complexity. The results support the predicted increase in the rate of energy dissipation, paralleled by an increase in the average heterogeneity of the population. Furthermore, the spatio-temporal evolution of the system is tested for the characteristic power-law relations of a nonlinear system poised in a critical state. The frequency distribution of consecutive increases in population size shows a significantly different exponent in functional relationship.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Roles for memory-based learning in robotics

Atkeson, C. G., Schaal, S.

In Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Robotics Research, pages: 503-521, Hidden Valley, PA, 1993, clmc (inproceedings)

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Design concurrent calculation: A CAD- and data-integrated approach

Schaal, S., Ehrlenspiel, K.

Journal of Engineering Design, 4, pages: 71-85, 1993, clmc (article)

Abstract
Besides functional regards, product design demands increasingly more for further reaching considerations. Quality alone cannot suffice anymore to compete in the market; design for manufacturability, for assembly, for recycling, etc., are well-known keywords. Those can largely be reduced to the necessity of design for costs. This paper focuses on a CAD-based approach to design concurrent calculation. It will discuss how, in the meantime well-established, tools like feature technology, knowledge-based systems, and relational databases can be blended into one coherent concept to achieve an entirely CAD- and data-integrated cost information tool. This system is able to extract data from the CAD-system, combine it with data about the company specific manufacturing environment, and subsequently autonomously evaluate manufacturability aspects and costs of the given CAD-model. Within minutes the designer gets quantitative in-formation about the major cost sources of his/her design. Additionally, some alternative methods for approximating manu-facturing times from empirical data, namely neural networks and local weighted regression, are introduced.

am

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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Open loop stable control strategies for robot juggling

Schaal, S., Atkeson, C. G.

In IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, 3, pages: 913-918, Piscataway, NJ: IEEE, Georgia, Atlanta, May 2-6, 1993, clmc (inproceedings)

Abstract
In a series of case studies out of the field of dynamic manipulation (Mason, 1992), different principles for open loop stable control are introduced and analyzed. This investigation may provide some insight into how open loop control can serve as a useful foundation for closed loop control and, particularly, what to focus on in learning control. 

am

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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In vivo diabetic wound healing with nanofibrous scaffolds modified with gentamicin and recombinant human epidermal growth factor

Dwivedi, C., Pandey, I., Pandey, H., Patil, S., Mishra, S. B., Pandey, A. C., Zamboni, P., Ramteke, P. W., Singh, A. V.

Journal of Biomedical Materials Research Part A, 106(3):641-651, March (article)

Abstract
Abstract Diabetic wounds are susceptible to microbial infection. The treatment of these wounds requires a higher payload of growth factors. With this in mind, the strategy for this study was to utilize a novel payload comprising of Eudragit RL/RS 100 nanofibers carrying the bacterial inhibitor gentamicin sulfate (GS) in concert with recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF); an accelerator of wound healing. GS containing Eudragit was electrospun to yield nanofiber scaffolds, which were further modified by covalent immobilization of rhEGF to their surface. This novel fabricated nanoscaffold was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X‐ray diffraction. The thermal behavior of the nanoscaffold was determined using thermogravimetric analysis and differential scanning calorimetry. In the in vitro antibacterial assays, the nanoscaffolds exhibited comparable antibacterial activity to pure gentemicin powder. In vivo work using female C57/BL6 mice, the nanoscaffolds induced faster wound healing activity in dorsal wounds compared to the control. The paradigm in this study presents a robust in vivo model to enhance the applicability of drug delivery systems in wound healing applications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 106A: 641–651, 2018.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]


link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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BIMROB – Bidirektionale Interaktion von Mensch und Roboter beim Bewegungslernen

Wiemeyer, J., Peters, J., Kollegger, G., Ewerton, M.

DVS Sportmotorik 2017 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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How does it feel to clap hands with a robot?

Fitter, N. T., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

International Journal of Social Robotics (article) Accepted

Abstract
Playful touch serves an important role in human development and interpersonal bonding. Accordingly, we believe future robots may need lighthearted touch capabilities in order to connect with people in meaningful ways. To begin exploring how users perceive playful human-robot hand-to-and interaction, we conducted a study with 20 participants. Each user played simple hand-clapping games with the Rethink Robotics Baxter Research Robot during a one-hour-long session involving 24 randomly ordered conditions that varied in facial reactivity, physical reactivity, stiffness, and tempo. Qualitative data collected from surveys and exper- iment recordings demonstrate that this interaction is viable: all users successfully completed the experiment, all users enjoyed at least one game, and nineteen of the 20 users identified at least one potential personal use for Baxter. Hand-clapping tempo was highly salient to users, and human-like robot errors were more widely accepted than mechanical errors. Through subjective experience data collected after each game variation, we found that perceptions of Baxter vary in the following statistically significant ways: facial reactivity increases the robot’s perceived pleasantness and arousal; physical reactivity decreases safety, pleasantness, arousal, and dominance; higher stiffness increases safety and decreases dominance; and faster tempo decreases safety, increases arousal, and increases dominance. These findings can motivate and guide roboticists who want to design social-physical human-robot interactions.

hi

[BibTex]

[BibTex]


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test jon
(book)

[BibTex]


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test
(article)

[BibTex]

[BibTex]