Header logo is
Institute News

Physicists discover why drying liquid crystal drops leave unusual 'coffee rings'

  • 30 May 2017

Phys.org

Penn alumnus Zoey Davidson, now a postdoc at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Germany, had been experimenting with Sunset Yellow, a dye that gives Doritos and orange soft drinks their bright colors, when he accidentally spilled some of the material.

Metin Sitti Zoey Davidson


Release of Bayesian Articulated Object Tracking Libraries

  • 29 May 2017

Robust and real-time Bayesian articulated object tracking methods, implemented in C++ and CUDA.

We release open-source code and data sets on Bayesian articulated object tracking. The library contains approaches towards problems ranging from single object tracking to full robot arm pose estimation. The data sets allow the quantitative evaluation of alternative approaches thanks to accurate ground-truth annotations.

Cristina Garcia Cifuentes Jan Issac Manuel Wüthrich Jeannette Bohg


Gecko-inspired multipurpose gripper

  • 26 May 2017

An elastic membrane covered with tiny fibres paired with a pressure differential enables a new soft gripper system with a high adhesion performance even on curved surfaces

Robots generally need a gripper that adapts to three-dimensional surfaces. Such a gripper needs to be soft to adapt to a great variety of geometries, but not too soft, as it will detach easily and not be able to bear weight for very long. Researchers working with Metin Sitti at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart developed a membrane equipped with microscopic fibres inspired by the fine hairs on a gecko's foot and attached it to a suction cup-like flexible body. An internal pressure differential ensures perfect conformation of the flexible gripper to a wide variety of surfaces and equally distributes the load over the entire contact interface. As a result, the researchers suppressed load induced stress concentrations at the edges, which strongly reduced the adhesion. The gripper demonstrates a 14-times higher adhesion than grippers without this load sharing mechanism.

Metin Sitti Sukho Song Dirk Drotlef


Gecko-inspired multipurpose gripper

  • 26 May 2017

An elastic membrane covered with tiny fibres paired with a pressure differential enables a new soft gripper system with a high adhesion performance even on curved surfaces

Robots generally need a gripper that adapts to three-dimensional surfaces. Such a gripper needs to be soft to adapt to a great variety of geometries, but not too soft, as it will detach easily and not be able to bear weight for very long. Researchers working with Metin Sitti at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems in Stuttgart developed a membrane equipped with microscopic fibres inspired by the fine hairs on a gecko's foot and attached it to a suction cup-like flexible body. An internal pressure differential ensures perfect conformation of the flexible gripper to a wide variety of surfaces and equally distributes the load over the entire contact interface. As a result, the researchers suppressed load induced stress concentrations at the edges, which strongly reduced the adhesion. The gripper demonstrates a 14-times higher adhesion than grippers without this load sharing mechanism.



Functional Microrobots Could Harbor Bioengineering Apps

  • 22 May 2017

HospiMedica.com

A new study suggests that untethered micron-scale mobile robots can navigate and non-invasively perform specific tasks inside hard-to-reach body sites. Currently being designed, fabricated, and tested at the Max Planck Institute for Intelligent Systems and Carnegie Mellon University, the first-generation microrobots will be able to deliver therapeutics and other cargo to targeted body sites, as well as to enclosed organ-on-a-chip microfluidic devices with live cells. A new two-step approach is use to provide the microrobotic devices with desirable functions. The first step uses three-dimensional (3D) laser lithography to crosslink light-responsive polymers.

Metin Sitti Hakan Ceylan Ceren Garip


In Zukunft mit Gefühl

  • 20 May 2017

Roboter können erstaunliche Dinge. Doch unser Tastsinn ist ihnen noch überlegen. Warum sich das bald ändern könnte – und was das heißt

Katherine Kuchenbecker


Bacteria-Driven Drug Delivery Carriers: A Paradigm Shift

  • 18 May 2017

Advanced Science News

Congrats to Babak, Oncay and Jiang that their paper, “Bioadhesive bacteria-driven microswimmers for targeted drug delivery in the urinary and gastrointestinal tracts”, is highlighted on their news website

Metin Sitti Babak Mostaghaci Oncay Yasa Jiang Zhuang


Tübingen exibition: "Origins" - Steps of Humankind

  • 18 May 2017

Opening of the exibition: Friday, May 19, 2017, 7:00 p.m., Schloß Hohentübingen (free entrance)

The exhibition in the Museum Ancient Cultures (Hohentübingen Castle) will focus on the most important steps of humankind. Our institute supports the last part of the exibition "Origin of digital innovation" with a Nao robot and the Mosh Camera App.

Vincent Berenz


3D-microrobots voor minuscule chirurgie

  • 16 May 2017

fpt-vimag.n

Een kleine robot die door een eenvoudige medische injectie in het menselijk lichaam wordt gebracht en daar rechtstreeks en doelgericht een niet te opereren tumor bestrijdt. Dit klinkt misschien een beetje als science fiction, maar onderzoekers werken momenteel druk aan het moderniseren van de gezondheidszorg met behulp van bio-engineering. De uitdagingen zitten vooral in het ontwerp, productieproces en de codering van de microrobots die dit moeten gaan realiseren.

Metin Sitti Hakan Ceylan Ceren Garip