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2020


STAR: Sparse Trained Articulated Human Body Regressor
STAR: Sparse Trained Articulated Human Body Regressor

Osman, A. A. A., Bolkart, T., Black, M. J.

In European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV) , LNCS 12355, pages: 598-613, August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
The SMPL body model is widely used for the estimation, synthesis, and analysis of 3D human pose and shape. While popular, we show that SMPL has several limitations and introduce STAR, which is quantitatively and qualitatively superior to SMPL. First, SMPL has a huge number of parameters resulting from its use of global blend shapes. These dense pose-corrective offsets relate every vertex on the mesh to all the joints in the kinematic tree, capturing spurious long-range correlations. To address this, we define per-joint pose correctives and learn the subset of mesh vertices that are influenced by each joint movement. This sparse formulation results in more realistic deformations and significantly reduces the number of model parameters to 20% of SMPL. When trained on the same data as SMPL, STAR generalizes better despite having many fewer parameters. Second, SMPL factors pose-dependent deformations from body shape while, in reality, people with different shapes deform differently. Consequently, we learn shape-dependent pose-corrective blend shapes that depend on both body pose and BMI. Third, we show that the shape space of SMPL is not rich enough to capture the variation in the human population. We address this by training STAR with an additional 10,000 scans of male and female subjects, and show that this results in better model generalization. STAR is compact, generalizes better to new bodies and is a drop-in replacement for SMPL. STAR is publicly available for research purposes at http://star.is.tue.mpg.de.

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Project Page Code Video paper supplemental DOI [BibTex]

2020


Project Page Code Video paper supplemental DOI [BibTex]


3D Morphable Face Models - Past, Present and Future
3D Morphable Face Models - Past, Present and Future

Egger, B., Smith, W. A. P., Tewari, A., Wuhrer, S., Zollhoefer, M., Beeler, T., Bernard, F., Bolkart, T., Kortylewski, A., Romdhani, S., Theobalt, C., Blanz, V., Vetter, T.

ACM Transactions on Graphics, 39(5), August 2020 (article)

Abstract
In this paper, we provide a detailed survey of 3D Morphable Face Models over the 20 years since they were first proposed. The challenges in building and applying these models, namely capture, modeling, image formation, and image analysis, are still active research topics, and we review the state-of-the-art in each of these areas. We also look ahead, identifying unsolved challenges, proposing directions for future research and highlighting the broad range of current and future applications.

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project page pdf preprint DOI [BibTex]

project page pdf preprint DOI [BibTex]


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Modular Block-diagonal Curvature Approximations for Feedforward Architectures

Dangel, F., Harmeling, S., Hennig, P.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 108, pages: 799-808, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Silvia Chiappa and Roberto Calandra), PMLR, August 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Monocular Expressive Body Regression through Body-Driven Attention
Monocular Expressive Body Regression through Body-Driven Attention

Choutas, V., Pavlakos, G., Bolkart, T., Tzionas, D., Black, M. J.

In Computer Vision – ECCV 2020, LNCS 12355, pages: 20-40, Springer International Publishing, Cham, August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
To understand how people look, interact, or perform tasks,we need to quickly and accurately capture their 3D body, face, and hands together from an RGB image. Most existing methods focus only on parts of the body. A few recent approaches reconstruct full expressive 3D humans from images using 3D body models that include the face and hands. These methods are optimization-based and thus slow, prone to local optima, and require 2D keypoints as input. We address these limitations by introducing ExPose (EXpressive POse and Shape rEgression), which directly regresses the body, face, and hands, in SMPL-X format, from an RGB image. This is a hard problem due to the high dimensionality of the body and the lack of expressive training data. Additionally, hands and faces are much smaller than the body, occupying very few image pixels. This makes hand and face estimation hard when body images are downscaled for neural networks. We make three main contributions. First, we account for the lack of training data by curating a dataset of SMPL-X fits on in-the-wild images. Second, we observe that body estimation localizes the face and hands reasonably well. We introduce body-driven attention for face and hand regions in the original image to extract higher-resolution crops that are fed to dedicated refinement modules. Third, these modules exploit part-specific knowledge from existing face and hand-only datasets. ExPose estimates expressive 3D humans more accurately than existing optimization methods at a small fraction of the computational cost. Our data, model and code are available for research at https://expose.is.tue.mpg.de.

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code Short video Long video arxiv pdf suppl link (url) DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]

code Short video Long video arxiv pdf suppl link (url) DOI Project Page Project Page [BibTex]


Category Level Object Pose Estimation via Neural Analysis-by-Synthesis
Category Level Object Pose Estimation via Neural Analysis-by-Synthesis

Chen, X., Dong, Z., Song, J., Geiger, A., Hilliges, O.

In European Conference on Computer Vision (ECCV), Springer International Publishing, Cham, August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Many object pose estimation algorithms rely on the analysis-by-synthesis framework which requires explicit representations of individual object instances. In this paper we combine a gradient-based fitting procedure with a parametric neural image synthesis module that is capable of implicitly representing the appearance, shape and pose of entire object categories, thus rendering the need for explicit CAD models per object instance unnecessary. The image synthesis network is designed to efficiently span the pose configuration space so that model capacity can be used to capture the shape and local appearance (i.e., texture) variations jointly. At inference time the synthesized images are compared to the target via an appearance based loss and the error signal is backpropagated through the network to the input parameters. Keeping the network parameters fixed, this allows for iterative optimization of the object pose, shape and appearance in a joint manner and we experimentally show that the method can recover orientation of objects with high accuracy from 2D images alone. When provided with depth measurements, to overcome scale ambiguities, the method can accurately recover the full 6DOF pose successfully.

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Project Page pdf suppmat [BibTex]

Project Page pdf suppmat [BibTex]


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Testing Goodness of Fit of Conditional Density Models with Kernels

Jitkrittum, W., Kanagawa, H., Schölkopf, B.

Proceedings of the 36th International Conference on Uncertainty in Artificial Intelligence (UAI), 124, pages: 221-230, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Jonas Peters and David Sontag), PMLR, August 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


GRAB: A Dataset of Whole-Body Human Grasping of Objects
GRAB: A Dataset of Whole-Body Human Grasping of Objects

Taheri, O., Ghorbani, N., Black, M. J., Tzionas, D.

In Computer Vision – ECCV 2020, LNCS 12355, pages: 581-600, Springer International Publishing, Cham, August 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Training computers to understand, model, and synthesize human grasping requires a rich dataset containing complex 3D object shapes, detailed contact information, hand pose and shape, and the 3D body motion over time. While "grasping" is commonly thought of as a single hand stably lifting an object, we capture the motion of the entire body and adopt the generalized notion of "whole-body grasps". Thus, we collect a new dataset, called GRAB (GRasping Actions with Bodies), of whole-body grasps, containing full 3D shape and pose sequences of 10 subjects interacting with 51 everyday objects of varying shape and size. Given MoCap markers, we fit the full 3D body shape and pose, including the articulated face and hands, as well as the 3D object pose. This gives detailed 3D meshes over time, from which we compute contact between the body and object. This is a unique dataset, that goes well beyond existing ones for modeling and understanding how humans grasp and manipulate objects, how their full body is involved, and how interaction varies with the task. We illustrate the practical value of GRAB with an example application; we train GrabNet, a conditional generative network, to predict 3D hand grasps for unseen 3D object shapes. The dataset and code are available for research purposes at https://grab.is.tue.mpg.de.

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pdf suppl video (long) video (short) link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

pdf suppl video (long) video (short) link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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How to navigate everyday distractions: Leveraging optimal feedback to train attention control

Wirzberger, M., Lado, A., Eckerstorfer, L., Oreshnikov, I., Passy, J., Stock, A., Shenhav, A., Lieder, F.

Annual Meeting of the Cognitive Science Society, July 2020 (conference)

Abstract
To stay focused on their chosen tasks, people have to inhibit distractions. The underlying attention control skills can improve through reinforcement learning, which can be accelerated by giving feedback. We applied the theory of metacognitive reinforcement learning to develop a training app that gives people optimal feedback on their attention control while they are working or studying. In an eight-day field experiment with 99 participants, we investigated the effect of this training on people's productivity, sustained attention, and self-control. Compared to a control condition without feedback, we found that participants receiving optimal feedback learned to focus increasingly better (f = .08, p < .01) and achieved higher productivity scores (f = .19, p < .01) during the training. In addition, they evaluated their productivity more accurately (r = .12, p < .01). However, due to asymmetric attrition problems, these findings need to be taken with a grain of salt.

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How to navigate everyday distractions: Leveraging optimal feedback to train attention control DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Analysis of motor development within the first year of life: 3-{D} motion tracking without markers for early detection of developmental disorders
Analysis of motor development within the first year of life: 3-D motion tracking without markers for early detection of developmental disorders

Parisi, C., Hesse, N., Tacke, U., Rocamora, S. P., Blaschek, A., Hadders-Algra, M., Black, M. J., Heinen, F., Müller-Felber, W., Schroeder, A. S.

Bundesgesundheitsblatt - Gesundheitsforschung - Gesundheitsschutz, 63, pages: 881–890, July 2020 (article)

Abstract
Children with motor development disorders benefit greatly from early interventions. An early diagnosis in pediatric preventive care (U2–U5) can be improved by automated screening. Current approaches to automated motion analysis, however, are expensive, require lots of technical support, and cannot be used in broad clinical application. Here we present an inexpensive, marker-free video analysis tool (KineMAT) for infants, which digitizes 3‑D movements of the entire body over time allowing automated analysis in the future. Three-minute video sequences of spontaneously moving infants were recorded with a commercially available depth-imaging camera and aligned with a virtual infant body model (SMIL model). The virtual image generated allows any measurements to be carried out in 3‑D with high precision. We demonstrate seven infants with different diagnoses. A selection of possible movement parameters was quantified and aligned with diagnosis-specific movement characteristics. KineMAT and the SMIL model allow reliable, three-dimensional measurements of spontaneous activity in infants with a very low error rate. Based on machine-learning algorithms, KineMAT can be trained to automatically recognize pathological spontaneous motor skills. It is inexpensive and easy to use and can be developed into a screening tool for preventive care for children.

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pdf on-line w/ sup mat DOI [BibTex]

pdf on-line w/ sup mat DOI [BibTex]


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Stochastic Frank-Wolfe for Constrained Finite-Sum Minimization

Negiar, G., Dresdner, G., Tsai, A. Y., El Ghaoui, L., Locatello, F., Freund, R. M., Pedregosa, F.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), pages: 296-305, July 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Learning Variable Impedance Control for Contact Sensitive Tasks
Learning Variable Impedance Control for Contact Sensitive Tasks

Bogdanovic, M., Khadiv, M., Righetti, L.

IEEE Robotics and Automation Letters ( Early Access ), IEEE, July 2020 (article)

Abstract
Reinforcement learning algorithms have shown great success in solving different problems ranging from playing video games to robotics. However, they struggle to solve delicate robotic problems, especially those involving contact interactions. Though in principle a policy outputting joint torques should be able to learn these tasks, in practice we see that they have difficulty to robustly solve the problem without any structure in the action space. In this paper, we investigate how the choice of action space can give robust performance in presence of contact uncertainties. We propose to learn a policy that outputs impedance and desired position in joint space as a function of system states without imposing any other structure to the problem. We compare the performance of this approach to torque and position control policies under different contact uncertainties. Extensive simulation results on two different systems, a hopper (floating-base) with intermittent contacts and a manipulator (fixed-base) wiping a table, show that our proposed approach outperforms policies outputting torque or position in terms of both learning rate and robustness to environment uncertainty.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


How to Train Your Differentiable Filter
How to Train Your Differentiable Filter

Alina Kloss, G. M. J. B.

In July 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
In many robotic applications, it is crucial to maintain a belief about the state of a system. These state estimates serve as input for planning and decision making and provide feedback during task execution. Recursive Bayesian Filtering algorithms address the state estimation problem, but they require models of process dynamics and sensory observations as well as noise characteristics of these models. Recently, multiple works have demonstrated that these models can be learned by end-to-end training through differentiable versions of Recursive Filtering algorithms.The aim of this work is to improve understanding and applicability of such differentiable filters (DF). We implement DFs with four different underlying filtering algorithms and compare them in extensive experiments. We find that long enough training sequences are crucial for DF performance and that modelling heteroscedastic observation noise significantly improves results. And while the different DFs perform similarly on our example task, we recommend the differentiable Extended Kalman Filter for getting started due to its simplicity.

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pdf [BibTex]


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Variational Autoencoders with Riemannian Brownian Motion Priors

Kalatzis, D., Eklund, D., Arvanitidis, G., Hauberg, S.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), pages: 6789-6799, July 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Variational Bayes in Private Settings (VIPS) (Extended Abstract)

Foulds, J. R., Park, M., Chaudhuri, K., Welling, M.

Proceedings of the 29th International Joint Conference on Artificial Intelligence, (IJCAI-PRICAI), pages: 5050-5054, (Editors: Christian Bessiere), International Joint Conferences on Artificial Intelligence Organization, July 2020, Journal track (conference)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Weakly-Supervised Disentanglement Without Compromises

Locatello, F., Poole, B., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Bachem, O., Tschannen, M.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), pages: 7753-7764, July 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Event-triggered Learning
Event-triggered Learning

Solowjow, F., Trimpe, S.

Automatica, 117, Elsevier, July 2020 (article)

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arXiv PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv PDF DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Being Bayesian, Even Just a Bit, Fixes Overconfidence in ReLU Networks

Kristiadi, A., Hein, M., Hennig, P.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), pages: 1226-1236, July 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Constant Curvature Graph Convolutional Networks

Bachmann*, G., Becigneul*, G., Ganea, O.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), pages: 9118-9128, July 2020, *equal contribution (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Leveraging Machine Learning to Automatically Derive Robust Planning Strategies from Biased Models of the Environment

Kemtur, A., Jain, Y. R., Mehta, A., Callaway, F., Consul, S., Stojcheski, J., Lieder, F.

CogSci 2020, July 2020, Anirudha Kemtur and Yash Raj Jain contributed equally to this publication. (conference)

Abstract
Teaching clever heuristics is a promising approach to improve decision-making. We can leverage machine learning to discover clever strategies automatically. Current methods require an accurate model of the decision problems people face in real life. But most models are misspecified because of limited information and cognitive biases. To address this problem we develop strategy discovery methods that are robust to model misspecification. Robustness is achieved by model-ing model-misspecification and handling uncertainty about the real-world according to Bayesian inference. We translate our methods into an intelligent tutor that automatically discovers and teaches robust planning strategies. Our robust cognitive tutor significantly improved human decision-making when the model was so biased that conventional cognitive tutors were no longer effective. These findings highlight that our robust strategy discovery methods are a significant step towards leveraging artificial intelligence to improve human decision-making in the real world.

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Project Page [BibTex]

Project Page [BibTex]


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Differentiable Likelihoods for Fast Inversion of ‘Likelihood-Free’ Dynamical Systems

Kersting, H., Krämer, N., Schiegg, M., Daniel, C., Tiemann, M., Hennig, P.

37th International Conference on Machine Learning (ICML), pages: 2655-2665, July 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Learning of sub-optimal gait controllers for magnetic walking soft millirobots
Learning of sub-optimal gait controllers for magnetic walking soft millirobots

Culha, U., Demir, S. O., Trimpe, S., Sitti, M.

In Proceedings of Robotics: Science and Systems, 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Untethered small-scale soft robots have promising applications in minimally invasive surgery, targeted drug delivery, and bioengineering applications as they can access confined spaces in the human body. However, due to highly nonlinear soft continuum deformation kinematics, inherent stochastic variability during fabrication at the small scale, and lack of accurate models, the conventional control methods cannot be easily applied. Adaptivity of robot control is additionally crucial for medical operations, as operation environments show large variability, and robot materials may degrade or change over time,which would have deteriorating effects on the robot motion and task performance. Therefore, we propose using a probabilistic learning approach for millimeter-scale magnetic walking soft robots using Bayesian optimization (BO) and Gaussian processes (GPs). Our approach provides a data-efficient learning scheme to find controller parameters while optimizing the stride length performance of the walking soft millirobot robot within a small number of physical experiments. We demonstrate adaptation to fabrication variabilities in three different robots and to walking surfaces with different roughness. We also show an improvement in the learning performance by transferring the learning results of one robot to the others as prior information.

pi ics

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Actively Learning Gaussian Process Dynamics
Actively Learning Gaussian Process Dynamics

Buisson-Fenet, M., Solowjow, F., Trimpe, S.

2nd Annual Conference on Learning for Dynamics and Control, June 2020 (conference) Accepted

Abstract
Despite the availability of ever more data enabled through modern sensor and computer technology, it still remains an open problem to learn dynamical systems in a sample-efficient way. We propose active learning strategies that leverage information-theoretical properties arising naturally during Gaussian process regression, while respecting constraints on the sampling process imposed by the system dynamics. Sample points are selected in regions with high uncertainty, leading to exploratory behavior and data-efficient training of the model. All results are verified in an extensive numerical benchmark.

ics

ArXiv [BibTex]

ArXiv [BibTex]


Learning to Dress 3D People in Generative Clothing
Learning to Dress 3D People in Generative Clothing

Ma, Q., Yang, J., Ranjan, A., Pujades, S., Pons-Moll, G., Tang, S., Black, M. J.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 6468-6477, IEEE, June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Three-dimensional human body models are widely used in the analysis of human pose and motion. Existing models, however, are learned from minimally-clothed 3D scans and thus do not generalize to the complexity of dressed people in common images and videos. Additionally, current models lack the expressive power needed to represent the complex non-linear geometry of pose-dependent clothing shape. To address this, we learn a generative 3D mesh model of clothed people from 3D scans with varying pose and clothing. Specifically, we train a conditional Mesh-VAE-GAN to learn the clothing deformation from the SMPL body model, making clothing an additional term on SMPL. Our model is conditioned on both pose and clothing type, giving the ability to draw samples of clothing to dress different body shapes in a variety of styles and poses. To preserve wrinkle detail, our Mesh-VAE-GAN extends patchwise discriminators to 3D meshes. Our model, named CAPE, represents global shape and fine local structure, effectively extending the SMPL body model to clothing. To our knowledge, this is the first generative model that directly dresses 3D human body meshes and generalizes to different poses.

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Project page Code Short video Long video arXiv DOI [BibTex]

Project page Code Short video Long video arXiv DOI [BibTex]


{GENTEL : GENerating Training data Efficiently for Learning to segment medical images}
GENTEL : GENerating Training data Efficiently for Learning to segment medical images

Thakur, R. P., Rocamora, S. P., Goel, L., Pohmann, R., Machann, J., Black, M. J.

Congrès Reconnaissance des Formes, Image, Apprentissage et Perception (RFAIP), June 2020 (conference)

Abstract
Accurately segmenting MRI images is crucial for many clinical applications. However, manually segmenting images with accurate pixel precision is a tedious and time consuming task. In this paper we present a simple, yet effective method to improve the efficiency of the image segmentation process. We propose to transform the image annotation task into a binary choice task. We start by using classical image processing algorithms with different parameter values to generate multiple, different segmentation masks for each input MRI image. Then, instead of segmenting the pixels of the images, the user only needs to decide whether a segmentation is acceptable or not. This method allows us to efficiently obtain high quality segmentations with minor human intervention. With the selected segmentations, we train a state-of-the-art neural network model. For the evaluation, we use a second MRI dataset (1.5T Dataset), acquired with a different protocol and containing annotations. We show that the trained network i) is able to automatically segment cases where none of the classical methods obtain a high quality result ; ii) generalizes to the second MRI dataset, which was acquired with a different protocol and was never seen at training time ; and iii) enables detection of miss-annotations in this second dataset. Quantitatively, the trained network obtains very good results: DICE score - mean 0.98, median 0.99- and Hausdorff distance (in pixels) - mean 4.7, median 2.0-.

ps

Project Page PDF [BibTex]

Project Page PDF [BibTex]


Generating 3D People in Scenes without People
Generating 3D People in Scenes without People

Zhang, Y., Hassan, M., Neumann, H., Black, M. J., Tang, S.

In Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 6194-6204, June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
We present a fully automatic system that takes a 3D scene and generates plausible 3D human bodies that are posed naturally in that 3D scene. Given a 3D scene without people, humans can easily imagine how people could interact with the scene and the objects in it. However, this is a challenging task for a computer as solving it requires that (1) the generated human bodies to be semantically plausible within the 3D environment (e.g. people sitting on the sofa or cooking near the stove), and (2) the generated human-scene interaction to be physically feasible such that the human body and scene do not interpenetrate while, at the same time, body-scene contact supports physical interactions. To that end, we make use of the surface-based 3D human model SMPL-X. We first train a conditional variational autoencoder to predict semantically plausible 3D human poses conditioned on latent scene representations, then we further refine the generated 3D bodies using scene constraints to enforce feasible physical interaction. We show that our approach is able to synthesize realistic and expressive 3D human bodies that naturally interact with 3D environment. We perform extensive experiments demonstrating that our generative framework compares favorably with existing methods, both qualitatively and quantitatively. We believe that our scene-conditioned 3D human generation pipeline will be useful for numerous applications; e.g. to generate training data for human pose estimation, in video games and in VR/AR. Our project page for data and code can be seen at: \url{https://vlg.inf.ethz.ch/projects/PSI/}.

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Code Video PDF DOI [BibTex]

Code Video PDF DOI [BibTex]


Walking Control Based on Step Timing Adaptation
Walking Control Based on Step Timing Adaptation

Khadiv, M., Herzog, A., Moosavian, S. A. A., Righetti, L.

IEEE Transactions on Robotics, 36, pages: 629 - 643, IEEE, June 2020 (article)

Abstract
Step adjustment can improve the gait robustness of biped robots; however, the adaptation of step timing is often neglected as it gives rise to nonconvex problems when optimized over several footsteps. In this article, we argue that it is not necessary to optimize walking over several steps to ensure gait viability and show that it is sufficient to merely select the next step timing and location. Using this insight, we propose a novel walking pattern generator that optimally selects step location and timing at every control cycle. Our approach is computationally simple compared to standard approaches in the literature, yet guarantees that any viable state will remain viable in the future. We propose a swing foot adaptation strategy and integrate the pattern generator with an inverse dynamics controller that does not explicitly control the center of mass nor the foot center of pressure. This is particularly useful for biped robots with limited control authority over their foot center of pressure, such as robots with point feet or passive ankles. Extensive simulations on a humanoid robot with passive ankles demonstrate the capabilities of the approach in various walking situations, including external pushes and foot slippage, and emphasize the importance of step timing adaptation to stabilize walking.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


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Kernel Conditional Density Operators

Schuster, I., Mollenhauer, M., Klus, S., Muandet, K.

Proceedings of the 23rd International Conference on Artificial Intelligence and Statistics (AISTATS), 108, pages: 993-1004, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Silvia Chiappa and Roberto Calandra), PMLR, June 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


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Where Does It End? - Reasoning About Hidden Surfaces by Object Intersection Constraints

Strecke, M., Stückler, J.

In Proceedings IEEE/CVF Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), IEEE/CVF International Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) 2020, June 2020 (inproceedings)

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preprint project page Code DOI [BibTex]

preprint project page Code DOI [BibTex]


Learning Constrained Dynamics with Gauss Principle adhering Gaussian Processes
Learning Constrained Dynamics with Gauss Principle adhering Gaussian Processes

Geist, A. R., Trimpe, S.

In Proceedings of the 2nd Conference on Learning for Dynamics and Control, pages: 225-234, 2nd Annual Conference on Learning for Dynamics and Control, June 2020 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
The identification of the constrained dynamics of mechanical systems is often challenging. Learning methods promise to ease an analytical analysis, but require considerable amounts of data for training. We propose to combine insights from analytical mechanics with Gaussian process regression to improve the model's data efficiency and constraint integrity. The result is a Gaussian process model that incorporates a priori constraint knowledge such that its predictions adhere to Gauss' principle of least constraint. In return, predictions of the system's acceleration naturally respect potentially non-ideal (non-)holonomic equality constraints. As corollary results, our model enables to infer the acceleration of the unconstrained system from data of the constrained system and enables knowledge transfer between differing constraint configurations.

ics

Proceedings of Machine Learning Research [BibTex]

Proceedings of Machine Learning Research [BibTex]


Learning Physics-guided Face Relighting under Directional Light
Learning Physics-guided Face Relighting under Directional Light

Nestmeyer, T., Lalonde, J., Matthews, I., Lehrmann, A. M.

In Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition, pages: 5123-5132, IEEE/CVF, June 2020 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
Relighting is an essential step in realistically transferring objects from a captured image into another environment. For example, authentic telepresence in Augmented Reality requires faces to be displayed and relit consistent with the observer's scene lighting. We investigate end-to-end deep learning architectures that both de-light and relight an image of a human face. Our model decomposes the input image into intrinsic components according to a diffuse physics-based image formation model. We enable non-diffuse effects including cast shadows and specular highlights by predicting a residual correction to the diffuse render. To train and evaluate our model, we collected a portrait database of 21 subjects with various expressions and poses. Each sample is captured in a controlled light stage setup with 32 individual light sources. Our method creates precise and believable relighting results and generalizes to complex illumination conditions and challenging poses, including when the subject is not looking straight at the camera.

ps

Paper [BibTex]

Paper [BibTex]


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A Kernel Mean Embedding Approach to Reducing Conservativeness in Stochastic Programming and Control

Zhu, J., Diehl, M., Schölkopf, B.

2nd Annual Conference on Learning for Dynamics and Control (L4DC), 120, pages: 915-923, Proceedings of Machine Learning Research, (Editors: Alexandre M. Bayen and Ali Jadbabaie and George Pappas and Pablo A. Parrilo and Benjamin Recht and Claire Tomlin and Melanie Zeilinger), PMLR, June 2020 (conference)

ei

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]


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Phenomenal Causality and Sensory Realism

Meding, K., Bruijns, S. A., Schölkopf, B., Berens, P., Wichmann, F. A.

i-Perception, 11(3):1-16, June 2020 (article)

ei

link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Learning and Tracking the {3D} Body Shape of Freely Moving Infants from {RGB-D} sequences
Learning and Tracking the 3D Body Shape of Freely Moving Infants from RGB-D sequences

Hesse, N., Pujades, S., Black, M., Arens, M., Hofmann, U., Schroeder, S.

IEEE Transactions on Pattern Analysis and Machine Intelligence (TPAMI), 42(10):2540-2551, 2020 (article)

Abstract
Statistical models of the human body surface are generally learned from thousands of high-quality 3D scans in predefined poses to cover the wide variety of human body shapes and articulations. Acquisition of such data requires expensive equipment, calibration procedures, and is limited to cooperative subjects who can understand and follow instructions, such as adults. We present a method for learning a statistical 3D Skinned Multi-Infant Linear body model (SMIL) from incomplete, low-quality RGB-D sequences of freely moving infants. Quantitative experiments show that SMIL faithfully represents the RGB-D data and properly factorizes the shape and pose of the infants. To demonstrate the applicability of SMIL, we fit the model to RGB-D sequences of freely moving infants and show, with a case study, that our method captures enough motion detail for General Movements Assessment (GMA), a method used in clinical practice for early detection of neurodevelopmental disorders in infants. SMIL provides a new tool for analyzing infant shape and movement and is a step towards an automated system for GMA.

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pdf Journal DOI [BibTex]

pdf Journal DOI [BibTex]


{VIBE}: Video Inference for Human Body Pose and Shape Estimation
VIBE: Video Inference for Human Body Pose and Shape Estimation

Kocabas, M., Athanasiou, N., Black, M. J.

In Proceedings IEEE Conf. on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR), pages: 5252-5262, IEEE, IEEE International Conference on Computer Vision and Pattern Recognition (CVPR) 2020, June 2020 (inproceedings)

Abstract
Human motion is fundamental to understanding behavior. Despite progress on single-image 3D pose and shape estimation, existing video-based state-of-the-art methodsfail to produce accurate and natural motion sequences due to a lack of ground-truth 3D motion data for training. To address this problem, we propose “Video Inference for Body Pose and Shape Estimation” (VIBE), which makes use of an existing large-scale motion capture dataset (AMASS) together with unpaired, in-the-wild, 2D keypoint annotations. Our key novelty is an adversarial learning framework that leverages AMASS to discriminate between real human motions and those produced by our temporal pose and shape regression networks. We define a temporal network architecture and show that adversarial training, at the sequence level, produces kinematically plausible motion sequences without in-the-wild ground-truth 3D labels. We perform extensive experimentation to analyze the importance of motion and demonstrate the effectiveness of VIBE on challenging 3D pose estimation datasets, achieving state-of-the-art performance. Code and pretrained models are available at https://github.com/mkocabas/VIBE

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arXiv code video supplemental video DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv code video supplemental video DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Biocompatible magnetic micro‐ and nanodevices: Fabrication of FePt nanopropellers and cell transfection
Biocompatible magnetic micro‐ and nanodevices: Fabrication of FePt nanopropellers and cell transfection

Kadiri, V. M., Bussi, C., Holle, A. W., Son, K., Kwon, H., Schütz, G., Gutierrez, M. G., Fischer, P.

Adv. Mat., 32(2001114), May 2020 (article)

Abstract
The application of nanoparticles for drug or gene delivery promises benefits in the form of single‐cell‐specific therapeutic and diagnostic capabilities. Many methods of cell transfection rely on unspecific means to increase the transport of genetic material into cells. Targeted transport is in principle possible with magnetically propelled micromotors, which allow responsive nanoscale actuation and delivery. However, many commonly used magnetic materials (e.g., Ni and Co) are not biocompatible, possess weak magnetic remanence (Fe3O4), or cannot be implemented in nanofabrication schemes (NdFeB). Here, it is demonstrated that co‐depositing iron (Fe) and platinum (Pt) followed by one single annealing step, without the need for solution processing, yields ferromagnetic FePt nanomotors that are noncytotoxic, biocompatible, and possess a remanence and magnetization that rival those of permanent NdFeB micromagnets. Active cell targeting and magnetic transfection of lung carcinoma cells are demonstrated using gradient‐free rotating millitesla fields to drive the FePt nanopropellers. The carcinoma cells express enhanced green fluorescent protein after internalization and cell viability is unaffected by the presence of the FePt nanopropellers. The results establish FePt, prepared in the L10 phase, as a promising magnetic material for biomedical applications with superior magnetic performance, especially for micro‐ and nanodevices.

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Interface-mediated spontaneous symmetry breaking and mutual communication between drops containing chemically active particles
Interface-mediated spontaneous symmetry breaking and mutual communication between drops containing chemically active particles

Singh, D., Domínguez, A., Choudhury, U., Kottapalli, S., Popescu, M., Dietrich, S., Fischer, P.

Nature Communications, 11(2210), May 2020 (article)

Abstract
Symmetry breaking and the emergence of self-organized patterns is the hallmark of com- plexity. Here, we demonstrate that a sessile drop, containing titania powder particles with negligible self-propulsion, exhibits a transition to collective motion leading to self-organized flow patterns. This phenomenology emerges through a novel mechanism involving the interplay between the chemical activity of the photocatalytic particles, which induces Mar- angoni stresses at the liquid–liquid interface, and the geometrical confinement provided by the drop. The response of the interface to the chemical activity of the particles is the source of a significantly amplified hydrodynamic flow within the drop, which moves the particles. Furthermore, in ensembles of such active drops long-ranged ordering of the flow patterns within the drops is observed. We show that the ordering is dictated by a chemical com- munication between drops, i.e., an alignment of the flow patterns is induced by the gradients of the chemicals emanating from the active particles, rather than by hydrodynamic interactions.

pf icm

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Data-efficient Auto-tuning with Bayesian Optimization: An Industrial Control Study
Data-efficient Auto-tuning with Bayesian Optimization: An Industrial Control Study

Neumann-Brosig, M., Marco, A., Schwarzmann, D., Trimpe, S.

IEEE Transactions on Control Systems Technology, 28(3):730-740, May 2020 (article)

Abstract
Bayesian optimization is proposed for automatic learning of optimal controller parameters from experimental data. A probabilistic description (a Gaussian process) is used to model the unknown function from controller parameters to a user-defined cost. The probabilistic model is updated with data, which is obtained by testing a set of parameters on the physical system and evaluating the cost. In order to learn fast, the Bayesian optimization algorithm selects the next parameters to evaluate in a systematic way, for example, by maximizing information gain about the optimum. The algorithm thus iteratively finds the globally optimal parameters with only few experiments. Taking throttle valve control as a representative industrial control example, the proposed auto-tuning method is shown to outperform manual calibration: it consistently achieves better performance with a low number of experiments. The proposed auto-tuning framework is flexible and can handle different control structures and objectives.

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arXiv (PDF) DOI Project Page [BibTex]

arXiv (PDF) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


Statistical reprogramming of macroscopic self-assembly with dynamic boundaries
Statistical reprogramming of macroscopic self-assembly with dynamic boundaries

Culha, U., Davidson, Z. S., Mastrangeli, M., Sitti, M.

Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 117(21):11306-11313, 2020 (article)

Abstract
Self-assembly is a ubiquitous process that can generate complex and functional structures via local interactions among a large set of simpler components. The ability to program the self-assembly pathway of component sets elucidates fundamental physics and enables alternative competitive fabrication technologies. Reprogrammability offers further opportunities for tuning structural and material properties but requires reversible selection from multistable self-assembling patterns, which remains a challenge. Here, we show statistical reprogramming of two-dimensional (2D), noncompact self-assembled structures by the dynamic confinement of orbitally shaken and magnetically repulsive millimeter-scale particles. Under a constant shaking regime, we control the rate of radius change of an assembly arena via moving hard boundaries and select among a finite set of self-assembled patterns repeatably and reversibly. By temporarily trapping particles in topologically identified stable states, we also demonstrate 2D reprogrammable stiffness and three-dimensional (3D) magnetic clutching of the self-assembled structures. Our reprogrammable system has prospective implications for the design of granular materials in a multitude of physical scales where out-of-equilibrium self-assembly can be realized with different numbers or types of particles. Our dynamic boundary regulation may also enable robust bottom-up control strategies for novel robotic assembly applications by designing more complex spatiotemporal interactions using mobile robots.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


General Movement Assessment from videos of computed {3D} infant body models is equally effective compared to conventional {RGB} Video rating
General Movement Assessment from videos of computed 3D infant body models is equally effective compared to conventional RGB Video rating

Schroeder, S., Hesse, N., Weinberger, R., Tacke, U., Gerstl, L., Hilgendorff, A., Heinen, F., Arens, M., Bodensteiner, C., Dijkstra, L. J., Pujades, S., Black, M., Hadders-Algra, M.

Early Human Development, 144, May 2020 (article)

Abstract
Background: General Movement Assessment (GMA) is a powerful tool to predict Cerebral Palsy (CP). Yet, GMA requires substantial training hampering its implementation in clinical routine. This inspired a world-wide quest for automated GMA. Aim: To test whether a low-cost, marker-less system for three-dimensional motion capture from RGB depth sequences using a whole body infant model may serve as the basis for automated GMA. Study design: Clinical case study at an academic neurodevelopmental outpatient clinic. Subjects: Twenty-nine high-risk infants were recruited and assessed at their clinical follow-up at 2-4 month corrected age (CA). Their neurodevelopmental outcome was assessed regularly up to 12-31 months CA. Outcome measures: GMA according to Hadders-Algra by a masked GMA-expert of conventional and computed 3D body model (“SMIL motion”) videos of the same GMs. Agreement between both GMAs was assessed, and sensitivity and specificity of both methods to predict CP at ≥12 months CA. Results: The agreement of the two GMA ratings was substantial, with κ=0.66 for the classification of definitely abnormal (DA) GMs and an ICC of 0.887 (95% CI 0.762;0.947) for a more detailed GM-scoring. Five children were diagnosed with CP (four bilateral, one unilateral CP). The GMs of the child with unilateral CP were twice rated as mildly abnormal. DA-ratings of both videos predicted bilateral CP well: sensitivity 75% and 100%, specificity 88% and 92% for conventional and SMIL motion videos, respectively. Conclusions: Our computed infant 3D full body model is an attractive starting point for automated GMA in infants at risk of CP.

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DOI [BibTex]

DOI [BibTex]


FootTile: a Rugged Foot Sensor for Force and Center of Pressure Sensing in Soft Terrain
FootTile: a Rugged Foot Sensor for Force and Center of Pressure Sensing in Soft Terrain

Felix Ruppert, , Badri-Spröwitz, A.

In Proceedings of the IEEE International Conference on Robotics and Automation, IEEE, International Conference on Robotics and Automation, May 2020 (inproceedings) Accepted

Abstract
In this paper, we present FootTile, a foot sensor for reaction force and center of pressure sensing in challenging terrain. We compare our sensor design to standard biomechanical devices, force plates and pressure plates. We show that FootTile can accurately estimate force and pressure distribution during legged locomotion. FootTile weighs 0.9g, has a sampling rate of 330 Hz, a footprint of 10×10 mm and can easily be adapted in sensor range to the required load case. In three experiments, we validate: first, the performance of the individual sensor, second an array of FootTiles for center of pressure sensing and third the ground reaction force estimation during locomotion in granular substrate. We then go on to show the accurate sensing capabilities of the waterproof sensor in liquid mud, as a showcase for real world rough terrain use.

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Youtube1 Youtube2 Presentation link (url) [BibTex]

Youtube1 Youtube2 Presentation link (url) [BibTex]


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Automatic Discovery of Interpretable Planning Strategies

Skirzyński, J., Becker, F., Lieder, F.

Machine Learning Journal, May 2020 (article) Submitted

Abstract
When making decisions, people often overlook critical information or are overly swayed by irrelevant information. A common approach to mitigate these biases is to provide decisionmakers, especially professionals such as medical doctors, with decision aids, such as decision trees and flowcharts. Designing effective decision aids is a difficult problem. We propose that recently developed reinforcement learning methods for discovering clever heuristics for good decision-making can be partially leveraged to assist human experts in this design process. One of the biggest remaining obstacles to leveraging the aforementioned methods for improving human decision-making is that the policies they learn are opaque to people. To solve this problem, we introduce AI-Interpret: a general method for transforming idiosyncratic policies into simple and interpretable descriptions. Our algorithm combines recent advances in imitation learning and program induction with a new clustering method for identifying a large subset of demonstrations that can be accurately described by a simple, high-performing decision rule. We evaluate our new AI-Interpret algorithm and employ it to translate information-acquisition policies discovered through metalevel reinforcement learning. The results of three large behavioral experiments showed that the provision of decision rules as flowcharts significantly improved people’s planning strategies and decisions across three different classes of sequential decision problems. Furthermore, a series of ablation studies confirmed that our AI-Interpret algorithm was critical to the discovery of interpretable decision rules and that it is ready to be applied to other reinforcement learning problems. We conclude that the methods and findings presented in this article are an important step towards leveraging automatic strategy discovery to improve human decision-making.

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Automatic Discovery of Interpretable Planning Strategies The code for our algorithm and the experiments is available Project Page [BibTex]


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Variational Bayes In Private Settings (VIPS)

Park, M., Foulds, J., Chaudhuri, K., Welling, M.

Journal of Artificial Intelligence Research, 68, pages: 109-157, May 2020 (article)

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link (url) DOI [BibTex]

link (url) DOI [BibTex]


Physical Variables Underlying Tactile Stickiness during Fingerpad Detachment
Physical Variables Underlying Tactile Stickiness during Fingerpad Detachment

Nam, S., Vardar, Y., Gueorguiev, D., Kuchenbecker, K. J.

Frontiers in Neuroscience, 14(235):1-14, April 2020 (article)

Abstract
One may notice a relatively wide range of tactile sensations even when touching the same hard, flat surface in similar ways. Little is known about the reasons for this variability, so we decided to investigate how the perceptual intensity of light stickiness relates to the physical interaction between the skin and the surface. We conducted a psychophysical experiment in which nine participants actively pressed their finger on a flat glass plate with a normal force close to 1.5 N and detached it after a few seconds. A custom-designed apparatus recorded the contact force vector and the finger contact area during each interaction as well as pre- and post-trial finger moisture. After detaching their finger, participants judged the stickiness of the glass using a nine-point scale. We explored how sixteen physical variables derived from the recorded data correlate with each other and with the stickiness judgments of each participant. These analyses indicate that stickiness perception mainly depends on the pre-detachment pressing duration, the time taken for the finger to detach, and the impulse in the normal direction after the normal force changes sign; finger-surface adhesion seems to build with pressing time, causing a larger normal impulse during detachment and thus a more intense stickiness sensation. We additionally found a strong between-subjects correlation between maximum real contact area and peak pull-off force, as well as between finger moisture and impulse.

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link (url) DOI Project Page [BibTex]


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Disentangling Factors of Variations Using Few Labels

Locatello, F., Tschannen, M., Bauer, S., Rätsch, G., Schölkopf, B., Bachem, O.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), April 2020 (conference)

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arXiv link (url) [BibTex]

arXiv link (url) [BibTex]


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Mixed-curvature Variational Autoencoders

Skopek, O., Ganea, O., Becigneul, G.

8th International Conference on Learning Representations (ICLR), April 2020 (conference)

ei

link (url) [BibTex]

link (url) [BibTex]


Non-linear interlinkages and key objectives amongst the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals
Non-linear interlinkages and key objectives amongst the Paris Agreement and the Sustainable Development Goals

Laumann, F., von Kügelgen, J., Barahona, M.

ICLR 2020 Workshop "Tackling Climate Change with Machine Learning", April 2020 (conference)

ei

arXiv PDF [BibTex]

arXiv PDF [BibTex]


Learning Multi-Human Optical Flow
Learning Multi-Human Optical Flow

Ranjan, A., Hoffmann, D. T., Tzionas, D., Tang, S., Romero, J., Black, M. J.

International Journal of Computer Vision (IJCV), (128):873-890, April 2020 (article)

Abstract
The optical flow of humans is well known to be useful for the analysis of human action. Recent optical flow methods focus on training deep networks to approach the problem. However, the training data used by them does not cover the domain of human motion. Therefore, we develop a dataset of multi-human optical flow and train optical flow networks on this dataset. We use a 3D model of the human body and motion capture data to synthesize realistic flow fields in both single-and multi-person images. We then train optical flow networks to estimate human flow fields from pairs of images. We demonstrate that our trained networks are more accurate than a wide range of top methods on held-out test data and that they can generalize well to real image sequences. The code, trained models and the dataset are available for research.

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pdf DOI poster link (url) DOI [BibTex]

pdf DOI poster link (url) DOI [BibTex]